Category: Carers

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Stay well strategies for everyone


Stay well strategies:

  • sleep well
  • eat well
  • exercise
  • manage stress
  • spend quality time with family and friends
  • engage in the local community
  • get professional support
  • use alternative therapies
  • work in a supportive workplace
  • have a holiday

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How can I go on?


Freddie Mercury was dying of aids when he wrote and sang this song.
He must have wondered how he could go on but he did,
and it was the most creative period in his whole life.

If you have a mental illness or are a carer,
there will be times you won’t know how you can go on. But you will.

There are people who believe in you and they will help to make you strong.
You belong, just as I belong and together we are strong.

How Can I Go On Lyrics

When all the salt is taken from the sea
I stand dethroned, I’m naked and I bleed
But when your finger points so savagely
Is anybody there to believe in me
To hear my plea and take care of me?

How can I go on, from day to day
Who can make me strong in every way
Where can I be safe, where can I belong
In this great big world of sadness
How can I forget those beautiful dreams that we shared
They’re lost and they’re nowhere to be found
How can I go on?

Sometimes I seem to tremble in the dark, I cannot see
When people frighten me
I try to hide myself so far from the crowd
Is anybody there to comfort me
Lord, take care of me

How can I go on (how can I go on)
From day to day (from day to day)
Who can make me strong (who can make me strong)
In every way (in every way)
Where can I be safe (where can I be safe)
Where can I belong (where can I belong)
In this great big world of sadness
(In this great big world of sadness)
How can I forget (how can I forget)
Those beautiful dreams that we shared
(Those beautiful dreams that we shared)
They’re lost and they’re nowhere to be found
How can I go on?

How can I go on? How can I go on? Go on, go on, go on

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What is mental health?


Mental health is defined by the World Health Organization as a state of well-being in which someone:
– realises his or her own abilities
– can cope with the normal stresses of life
– can work fully and productively
– is able to make a contribution to his or her community.

A healthy person has a healthy mind and is able to:
– think clearly
– solve problems in life
– work productively
– enjoy good relationships with other people
– feel spiritually at ease
– make a contribution to the community.

Mental health is more than just the absence of mental disorder.

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Interview with Luke Grant on radio 2GB


NSW Carer of the Year Anne Naylor

Tuesday October 15, 2013

NSW Carer of the Year Anne Naylor speaks to Luke about receiving the award and Carers Week

Listen to NSW Carer of the Year Anne Naylor:

http://www.2gb.com/audioplayer/18191#.Ul3ymBZeKFU

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Interview with Paul Murray on radio 2UE


 Carers deserve a greater profile

 

Posted by: 2UE | 15 October, 2013 – 9:41 AM
Mother of 4 Anne Naylor is announced NSW Carer of the Year
It’s estimated carers provide 1.32 billion hours of care each year, saving taxpayers $40b. Paul Murray spoke with Anne Naylor from West Pennant Hills who has been named 2013 NSW Carer of the Year.
http://www.2ue.com.au/blogs/2ue-blog/carers-deserve-a-greater-profile/20131015-2vjbz.html

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Donate to Wesley Mission Program


At some time in our lives, every one of us will need support. Who will support you when you need it? What if you have really bad depression and you have little kids? What if you don’t have a job or a car? What if you have no family to help out?

For the rest of 2013, I will be donating my proceeds of my book, ‘Art From Adversity: A Life With Bipolar’ to the Wesley Aunties and Uncles Program to support children and carers in disadvantaged or challenging circumstances. This program does an amazing job and we should support them.

About Wesley Aunties & Uncles

The Wesley Aunties & Uncles program helps to build a better life for children. This is achieved through an early intervention mentoring program based on an extended family model of ‘aunts and uncles’ who provide mentoring and guidance in a stable family environment. Qualified staff assess volunteers and evaluate the needs of children to link them together.

Spending time with each other for one weekend a month, Aunties and Uncles:

  • provide the opportunity for children to experience the stability and benefits of an extended family
  • support the role of the parent/s of the child
  • provide the opportunity for volunteers to make a positive contribution to a child’s life

Wesley Aunties & Uncles provide mentoring services in the Sydney metropolitan area and the Central Coast.

To find out more about Wesley Aunties & Uncles go to: http://www.wesleymission.org.au/Centres/Out_Of_Home_Care/Our_services/Aunties_and_Uncles.asp

To donate to Wesley Mission go to http://www.wesleymission.org.au/donate

Purchase ‘Art From Adversity: A Life With Bipolar’ here, from my website www.atnaylor.com or from the publisher, Interactive Publications at http://ipoz.biz/Store/NewReleases/2013.htm

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The 2013 NSW Carers Awards


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Being a carer


When I was growing up I knew I wanted to be a mother, and I was blessed with four beautiful children who are all now young adults. They each have skills and talents as well as difficulties and challenges. For me, being a mother and a carer is a privilege and an honour. My children have taught me a lot about what is important in life, and what is not. As well as worries and struggles, there are inherent joys and pleasures.

Being a carer has shaped who I am. It has influenced the friends I have made, the career I have chosen, the area I live in and the beliefs and attitudes I hold. As a carer I am resourceful and capable. There are some things I do really well, but there are some things I struggle with. Perfection and I parted company a long time ago. Some days are good and some are not so good. Having bipolar disorder makes my caring role more difficult, but try to be positive and I never give up.

My role in life is to be the best person I can be, so that I can look after my family and, together with my husband, raise our children to be good people who achieve to their full potential, whatever that may be, who have a strong sense of social justice and who to contribute to society. Each of them achieves these things and I am very proud of them.

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The economic value of carers


Play the youtube clip while you are reading the post.

Job Advertisement
Wanted:

A person willing to work all hours of the day, 7 days a week, with no sick days, personal leave or holidays. There is no salary, bonus plan or superannuation. You must be a self-starter and an entrepreneur. You must also be willing to learn the job by trial and error. You must be emotionally involved with the person you are going to work for and be willing to work until you are exhausted. The person you are going to work for may not be able to express any appreciation and may even be abusive to you at times.  Anyone interested in the job, apply immediately.

In 2010 Carers Australia commissioned Access Economics to undertake an Australian study of the economic value of the informal care provided by unpaid family carers for people with disability, mental illness, chronic conditions, terminal illness and the frail aged. That report found that the value of informal care exceeded $40 billion per annum in 2010. This was based on the replacement cost of care of $31 per hour. A huge proportion of this cost was due to demographic ageing, but mental illness significantly contributed to the increasing number of Australians who required and received care. Informal carers (overall) provide over $1.32 billion hours of care each year, and represent a precious economic resource. (The economic value of informal care in 2010, Access economics report for Carers Australia).

As a community we need to appreciate our carers. There are a lot of us out there, and a little validation goes a long way.

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Mental Health Matters Awards


I attended the launch of Mental Health Month at NSW Parliament House on Tuesday 1st October.  It was a wonderful occasion and I felt privileged to be invited to attend.

There was a very special atmosphere and the speeches were inspirational, particularly that of the the Governer, Professor Marie Bashir, AC, CVO.

I received a Certificate of Commendation and Professor Gin Malhi from The CADE Clinic received the Research and Evaluation Award.

Anne & Gin 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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